0 comments on “The Liberated Countries in the Care for the Dead”

The Liberated Countries in the Care for the Dead

The liberated countries provided the most immense amount of help in finding, identifying, and honouring dead British soldiers, sailors, and airmen. This new article gives a number of examples of their invaluable contribution: The Liberated Countries and the War Dead

0 comments on “Identification of the Military Dead: US and UK”

Identification of the Military Dead: US and UK

This is a new article, looking at the huge difference in identification rates between the American and British programmes for the dead. Unlike the Americans, who ran a joint programme for soldiers and airmen, the British Army and the RAF had two somewhat separate agendas, reflecting the RAF’s intense concentration on finding and identifying its missing. Identification Rates – American and British

0 comments on “John Conybeare Landon & the Aspin Crew”

John Conybeare Landon & the Aspin Crew

The Aspin crew are buried at Hotton in Belgium (their graves having been relocated from Germany after the war). All crew losses are tragic, but in the case of John Conybeare Landon his death was one of three wartime tragedies which were suffered by the Landon family. What also makes the crew’s story so memorable is the testimony which was given about the loss of the crew by a Frenchman, a forced labourer in Germany, who witnessed the crash in February 1944.

John Conybeare Landon & the Aspin Crew

0 comments on “Air Ministry Casualty Branch, Oxford Street”

Air Ministry Casualty Branch, Oxford Street

Oxford Street is so associated nowadays with shopping, eating out, and generally having fun that it is difficult to imagine that the Air Ministry Casualty Branch, dealing with many thousands of tragic losses, was once situated there at the Tottenham Court Road end.

From late in 1942 until March 1947, the offices processed the paperwork on dead, missing, and injured airmen. See this page: Casualty Branch, Oxford Street